Tag Archives: Hermetic

From Hermes Trismegistus to Asclepius: Definitions (Part 1)

Translated by Jean-Pierre Mahe and presented in The Way of Hermes.

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1. God: an intelligible world; world: a sensible God; man: a destructible world; God: an immovable world; heaven: a movable world; man: a reasonable world. Then there are three worlds. Now the immovable world is God, and the reasonable world is man: for both of these units are one: God and man after the species.

2. Consequently there are three worlds on the whole: two units make up the sensible and one is the intelligible; one is after the species, and the third one is after its fullness. All of the multiple belongs to the three worlds; two of them are visible: namely the sensible and man, that destructible world; and the intelligible is this God: he is not visible, but evident within the visible things.

3. Just as soul keeps up the figure while being within the body, which cannot possibly be constituted without a soul, likewise all of the visible cannot possibly be constituted without the invisible.

4. Now man is a small world because of soul and breath, and a perfect world whose magnitude does not exceed the sensible god, i.e. the world. The world is intelligible and God is Nous; he is the truly uncreated, the intelligible; by essence, the uncreated and the ineffable, the intelligible good. In a word, God is the intelligible world, the immovable Monad, the invisible world, the intelligible, invisible and ineffable good.

5. God is eternal and uncreated; man is mortal although he is ever-living. Continue reading

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On Alchemy – Jacob Needleman

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Table Talk 161-81

From Suggestive Inquiry into the Hermetic Mystery by Mary Anne Atwood:

161. I am perfectly sure that the Hermetic is the only true key to the old myths, and to Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, because the solution which it gives is entirely adequate to the subject. Proclus develops the ontological basis of the Iliad; Virgil wrote on the same initiated ground; the Georgic’s are an allegory all through, an analogical instruction in celestial and spiritual agriculture. I regard the whole of the Aeneid as illustrative of the same truths in another form, — the 6th Book markedly so.

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Table Talk 141-60

From Suggestive Inquiry into the Hermetic Mystery by Mary Anne Atwood:

141. If you seek a finite end first, i.e., before you seek the Universal — the Kingdom of God — which you are ordered to do, you will have to give up the former at every stage, if a right seeker; and unless you are wicked, and steal the first fruits of the spirit’s offering, all sorts of gifts are offered; you may stop in any of them; if you do, you commit idolatry. It is against God’s ordinance; that the real truth as expressed in the 1st and 2nd Commandments especially; though it is a breach of all, in the higher spiritualistic sense.

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Table Talk 121-40

From Suggestive Inquiry into the Hermetic Mystery by Mary Anne Atwood:
121. “Man is the servant and interpreter of Nature”, says Bacon, and truly, so long as he goes outwardly and away from himself and from God to find knowledge; but when he returns within according to the Divine Ordinance and law of Reason, but that he has a capacity in his own principle of being and life, when allied to God, to become, next to Him, her revealer and master.

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Table Talk 101-120

From Suggestive Inquiry into the Hermetic Mystery by Mary Anne Atwood:

101. The perfection of each man is to submit to have his fundamental faith, which is his individual Logos, perfectly elaborated — i.e., fermented — so as to transmute the whole being, so that the whole body, soul and spirit may be saved in it. Few have ever perfected this, though there were doubtless degrees of it; the birth of this life prevents the complete work; it is not intended to be completed till the time comes.

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Table Talk 81-100

From Suggestive Inquiry into the Hermetic Mystery by Mary Anne Atwood:
81. There is a war in the Work between the self-will and the Universal Will, and all the faculties and desires are engaged on one side or the other; the effort of the Universal Will is to draw them into its service by first destroying them, and then reproducing them in a transmuted form.

82. The Solar Tincture (Tinctura Solaris) is the Aurific Light.

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